Black Holes and Globular Clusters

Black Holes and Globular Clusters

Recently astronomers have observed traces ‘Black Holes’ in four globular clusters in our Milky Way galaxy through X-ray or radion detection. This has sparked a discussion in the astronomy community on the understanding of black holes evaluation and estimation black holes numbers within a globular cluster. We try to understand the theory of our galaxy, globular cluster and phenomena of black hole evolution in it.

For that let’s understand each individual component first.

What is the Globular Cluster?

It is very dense collections of ancient stars (having age 9-12 billion years) in the universe. If we consider, Nebulae are the stellar nurseries of the cosmos, then globular clusters are the stellar nursing homes. As nebulae teach us, how the formation of young stars take place, globular clusters are able to teach us, how old stars evolve and age. Which occasionally ends with an older, massive star collapsing into a black hole.
As globular clusters contain the largest and oldest stars in the universe, It is the prime hotspot for Black Holes formation, which forms when these massive stars die and collapse under their own gravity. However, recent theories suggest that, while black holes likely form in a globular cluster, they should quickly get ejected through interactions within the nucleus of the cluster.
As per a recent study, three globular clusters (47 Tuc, M 10, M22) within the Milky Way have been found, in which traces of black holes have been found by observing an exceptionally bizarre orbital behavior of a specific star in the cluster. These three globular clusters have candidates identified to be black holes through radio and X-ray observations.